Galerie Gilla Lörcher

Contemporary Art

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John Cornu, Ivan Liovik Ebel

Hier und da

Installation Views

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Installation view: John Cornu / Ivan Liovik Ebel, hier und da 2014 at Galerie Gilla Loercher

Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Works

Wood, paint and shoe wax \r<br>240 x 269 x 29 cm\r\n \r\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

John Cornu, Untitled, 2012

Wood, paint and shoe wax
240 x 269 x 29 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Marble and bronze, wooden pedestal <br>135 x 35 x 35 cm \n\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher and the artist

John Cornu, Choses tues (Things unspoken), 2014

Marble and bronze, wooden pedestal
135 x 35 x 35 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher and the artist

Marble and bronze, wooden pedestal <br>128 x 35 x 35 cm \n\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher and the artist

John Cornu, Choses tues (Things unspoken), 2014

Marble and bronze, wooden pedestal
128 x 35 x 35 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher and the artist

Sublimationprint on fabric, 3 parts \r<br>each 164 x 90 cm \r\n\r\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Ivan Liovik Ebel, Makulatur, 2014

Sublimationprint on fabric, 3 parts
each 164 x 90 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Oil on canvas, 2 parts,  \r<br>each 33 x 28 cm \r\n\r\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Ivan Liovik Ebel, Loop, 2014

Oil on canvas, 2 parts,
each 33 x 28 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch, courtesy Galerie Gilla Loercher

Oil on canvas, 2 parts \r<br>each 38 x 30 cm \r\n\r\nPhoto: Cordia Schlegelmilch

Ivan Liovik Ebel, Loop, 2014

Oil on canvas, 2 parts
each 38 x 30 cm Photo: Cordia Schlegelmilch

Oil on canvas, 2 parts, <br>each 38 x 30 cm \n\nPhoto: Ivan Liovik Ebel

Loop, 2014

Oil on canvas, 2 parts,
each 38 x 30 cm Photo: Ivan Liovik Ebel

Press Release

/
For the autumn 2014 exhibition in the Galerie Gilla Lörcher, artist Ivan Liovik Ebel has invited France-domiciled colleague, John Cornu, to collaboratively develop an exhibition concept. In close cooperation, the idea for ‘Hier und da’ thus evolved, which questions the notion of the artistic duplicate. ‘Individual works and series based on repeated gestures and regulating principles question the idea of the original and the copy, temporality, change, chronology and the relationship between time and space in the process of creating an image’, states Ivan Liovik Ebel.

‘Interspace’ is probably the term that best summarises Ivan Liovik Ebel’s work. For him, the confrontation with the relativity of perception, forms of non-distinguishability and the relationship between time and space stand behind this term. It is always about the attempt to stage a condition beyond strict opposites such as the visible and the non-visible, the past and the future, to abolish or capture transitions between them.
John Cornu essentially works in situ adapting his practice and formal language to the spaces that he inhabits: an architectural graft on Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, an exhibition of burnt stretchers in a gallery, or else “wild” cleaning of a portion of wall in a public space. His works often evoke the theme of travesty, tracing “the contours of a manipulated reality where what we are given to observe never exactly corresponds to what we think we are observing” (Christian Alandete).

"Black wooden slats lean regularly on the wall as if saved from the fire, opposite three stained lengths of cloth that appear to carry the dust of centuries. At the rear of the room is a sculpture that looks like a relict of classical modernism. There is an excessive ambivalence here, entering this reminiscent space that simultaneously transmits extreme contemporaneity. Three art objects create an interior architectural staging of deception between what one believes one knows and what is actually to be seen. Art historical references provoke the questioning of the store of knowledge, the ordering of classifications and are, nevertheless, taken to absurdity because the works do not deliver their promise to find what one believes one seeks. Instead one must see anew. The locations of temporality with questions of debut and simultaneity are intrinsic to the casual-sounding exhibition title chosen by the artists for their first collaborative presentation. Their conceptual works in this exhibition range from comprehensive thoughts on repetitive processes and regulating principles, chronology and simultaneity to appropriation and transformations. Both artists thereby refer with a wink to art history, to principles of duplication, as well as examine the existential question for artworks: that of the original and the copy. In doing so, they instigate considerations of manipulation in a globalised present flooded with images and symbols.
Thus, the hand-polished, painted and waxed wooden slats from John Cornu are more than a poetic reformulation of Minimal Art. Irregular, organic sanding gives an unspecific negative image in the arrangement of the slats. From certain angles the outlines of emptiness appear to form a (white) square in the black slats. Opposite, the three light fabric images of Ivan Liovik Ebel play differently with the visible and the non-visible. The stains, generated on a computer, change with each printing onto cloth, its folds hiding or emphasising structures. A generated principle of chance whereby the ‘canvas’ is reformulated as an object that simultaneously creates an ephemeral image.
John Cornu has pushed all the figurative trophies, which in bronze on marble plinths once teemed with achievements and power, off the pedestal, and converted the revolutionary manifestos of the 20th century avant-garde. Dissected marble slabs now wrestle for formal-aesthetic balance while each figuration melts in denial of bronze geometry. Ivan Liovik Ebel, however, plumbs the limits of his artistic creation and questions the developmental processes of an image. Through parallel works, he attempts to reproduce moments and create simultaneity. His failure in this leads to the result that there is no original and no copy, but always two works." (Text: art historian Constanze Musterer / Translated by Heather Allen)


French artist John Cornu, born 1976, lives and works in Rennes and Paris. His work has been shown in many art insitutions and galleries s.a.: Palais de Tokyo, Paris (F), Cneai, Paris (F), Musèe des Beaux-arts, Calais (F), Musée des Beaux-arts, Rennes (F), Biennale de Lyon (F), Circa, Montréal (CAN), ZQM, Berlin (D), Busan Biennale (KR), Biennale d`art contemporain de Jukoutsk (RUS), Ricou Gallery, Bruxelles (BE), Galerie Anne de Villepoix, Paris (F), a.o.

Swiss artist Ivan Liovik Ebel, born 1983, lives and works in Berlin. He received his Masters in Contemporary Arts Practice at the Hochschule der Künste in Bern. His work has been shown at: Kunsthaus Langenthal (CH), Kunsthalle Bern (CH), Neue Galerie, London (GB) und Bern (CH), Marks Blond Project, Bern (CH), Galerie Widmer Theodoridis, Zürich (CH), Galerie Gilla Lörcher I Contemporary Art, Berlin (D) a.o.